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Fraternity Life

Greek Letter Fraternities and Social Fellowships are extracurricular organizations chartered by the College. The College encourages fraternities and social fellowship organizations to contribute to the fulfillment of its mission by promoting academic excellence, exercising collegial spirit, celebrating pluralism, recognizing the interdependence of campus organizations, and respecting the dignity of the entire College community. The College does not recognize fraternities and social fellowship organizations as secret societies because secrecy is incompatible with the College's mission to maintain an open exchange of ideas and information.

To be classified as a fraternity or social fellowship and operate on campus, organizations must be nationally affiliated and adhere to various rules and regulations established by the College. Compliance with College policies, procedures and regulations always supersedes any oaths of secrecy fraternity members may take. The College recognizes the following Greek Letter organizations:

Alpha Phi Alpha Iota Phi Theta
Kappa Alpha Psi Phi Mu Alpha
Omega Psi Phi Groove Phi Groove
Phi Beta Sigma  

Relationship Statement

Fraternity Life has been an integral part of student life since the establishment of the first chapter on campus in 1921. The College’s relationship to the active fraternity chapters is more than recognizing them as mere student organizations; it is a close relationship based upon mutual interests and reciprocal support. Recognizing that membership in a fraternity can be a positive and educational experience, the College supports the notion that membership offers an enriched collegiate experience where students learn to be academically, civically, and socially engaged.

Both the College and Fraternity Life share a bond in that they focus on the development of the individual. It can be stated that the active Fraternity chapters have a mission equal to that of Morehouse College.

Fraternities are co-curricular organizations chartered by the College. The College encourages fraternities to contribute to the fulfillment of its mission by promoting academic excellence, exercising collegial spirit, celebrating pluralism, leadership, and service. The College does not recognize fraternities as secret societies. Secret societies are incompatible with the College's aim to maintain an open exchange of ideas and information.

To be classified as a fraternity and operate on campus, organizations must be nationally affiliated and adhere to various rules and regulations established by the College. Compliance with College policies, procedures and regulations always supersedes any oaths of secrecy fraternity members may take.

Mission of Fraternity Life

The mission is to promote academic excellence, civic engagement, leadership development, and respect for diversity and social justice.

Vision of Fraternity Life

The vision is to become the premier source for the development of members of Black Greek Letter Fraternities and policies for Greek Letter Organizations.

Statement of Ethical Practice

In order to build a stronger community at Morehouse College, fraternity members will be guided by the following code of ethics:

  • Members will treat others as they wish to be treated; therefore, they will not physically, mentally, psychologically or sexually abuse anyone.
  • Members will strive for academic success and practice academic integrity.
  • Members will act as role models for the entire Morehouse community.
  • Each fraternity chapter will provide support for other Morehouse College fraternity chapters and their members at all times.
  • Members will make ethical decisions and be personally responsible and accountable, even when faced with difficult choices.
  • Members will celebrate diversity and accept the differences and believes of others.
  • Members will recognize and support the Morehouse College hazing policy.

Learning Outcomes

The desired learning outcomes include:

  1. Students will learn how to use knowledge acquired through curricular and co-curricular experiences and apply it to daily life.
  2. Students will develop skills that will enhance levels of critical and reflective thinking, reasoning, and creativity.
  3. Students will utilize self-appraisal, self-understanding, commitment to ethics, and spiritual awareness to develop themselves individually.
  4. Students will develop meaningful relationships, interdependence, collaboration, and effective leadership skills.
  5. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of pluralism, social and civic responsibility along with a global perspective.
  6. Students will improve communication skills, technical competence, and professional development, while maintaining a healthy lifestyle.
  7. To achieve our learning outcomes the Office of Student Life will ensure that Fraternities focus on the following areas:

Scholarship
This is one of the most important aspects of college life. All fraternity and chapters from Intake through graduation emphasize academics. Each fraternity provides some form of scholastic assistance, such as, study sessions, tutoring awards, and incentives such as scholarships, to challenge members to reach their full academic potential. Fraternity members usually maintain a higher grade point average than non-members. While fraternities do not hold any magical keys to scholastic success, studies have shown that members of fraternities are more likely to obtain a degree than non-affiliated students.

Leadership
Fraternities exemplify democracy in action. They are families, communities, and may have legal corporations for alumni who support these activities. New members live and learn to work within these communities. Officers within each chapter are elected to manage the day-to-day operations of the organization. These officers are assisted by members serving on committees and by alumni who act as advisors. In addition, many national organizations have regional and national leadership conferences where students can learn a variety of leadership skills. Fraternities provide a solid foundation in leadership training that prepares them for the demands and responsibilities needed for the future.

Community Service
Community service is an important aspect of fraternity life. Each fraternal organization was founded upon community service and offers unique opportunities for members to serve their community. From volunteering in elementary schools to giving blood to raising money for charities such as the American Heart Association and the Ronald McDonald House, fraternities are lending a helping hand.

Social Engagement
For many students, the fraternity social life helps to make college a more fulfilling experience. Fraternities provide a calendar of social activities including formals, homecoming, mixers, step shows, and other special events. Fraternities can offer more of a family atmosphere and go beyond ordinary friendships… often lasting a lifetime.

HAZING

Physical abuse of any kind is prohibited both on and off campus. Examples of physical abuse, commonly known as “hazing,” are paddling, slapping, kicking, choking, scratching, exposure to extreme conditions, sleep-deprivation and exhaustive physical activities such as jogging, weight-lifting, or aerobic exercise.

Verbal and mental abuse of any kind is prohibited, including, but not limited to, screaming at, belittling or humiliating participants; using derogatory, profane or obscene language toward them; or requiring participants to engage in morally degrading or humiliating games or activities that are likely to embarrass participants, and damage their moral code.

Ingesting foreign objects or substances, and consumption of alcohol and/or the use of other drugs or using participants’ cars, money or clothes or other personal property are strictly prohibited.

Participants may not be required to engage in any activity that causes the participant to sleep in class, fail to attend class, fail to submit assignments, or fail to prepare for examinations, presentations or any other course requirement.

The College forbids all fraternities and their members from arranging and participating in any hazing activities. The College uses the Official Code of Georgia Annotated; Section 16-5-61 Hazing as its guide:

(a) As used in this Code section, the term:
(1) “Haze” means to subject a student to an activity, which endangers or is likely to endanger the physical health of a student, regardless of a student’s willingness to participate in such activity. (2) “School” means any school, college or university in this state.
(3) “School organization,” means any club, society, fraternity, sorority or group living together which has students as its principal members.
(4) “Student” means any person enrolled in school in this state.

(b) It shall be unlawful for any person to haze any student in connection with or as a condition or pre-condition of gaining acceptance, membership, office, or other status in school organization.

(c) Any person who violates this Code section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of a high and aggravate nature. (Code 1981, 16-5-61, enacted by Ga. L. 1988, p. 694. 1: Ga. L. 1990,1).

In addition to criminal penalties, chapters and individual fraternity members who participate in hazing will be subject to disciplinary action by the College.

Fraternity Life Intake

Coordination of Fraternity Life on Campus

Hazing Sanctions

Eligibility Requirements

Membership Intake

Responsibilities of Fraternal Organizations