Goal II: Global Citizenship

Goal II: To Provide Experiences That Will Enhance the Understanding of Other Cultures and Nations.

 

Objective A.  To enhance and expand the campus influence of the W.E.B. DuBois International House as a living-learning center.

The International (I-House) Task Force
Chair:  Ida Mukenge, Professor, Department of Sociology
Jarrett Coger, Resident Director
Charles Osiris, Former Associate Dean
Michael Janis, Assistant Professor, English
Anthony Pinder, Director, Andrew Young Center for International Studies

a. Program Description

(i) The W.E.B. Du Bois International House Living Learning Center

  

The Morehouse College W.E.B. Du Bois International House (The I-House) is a unique living and learning community that brings students of diverse backgrounds (International Students and U.S. students) together in an atmosphere that promotes mutual respect, leadership development, multicultural learning, and global awareness. The W.E.B. Du Bois International House opened in the fall semester of 2007 as a unit of residential life on the campus in support of the following goals to internationalize the student learning experience at Morehouse College:

  • Establish a supportive community for international students
  • Facilitate educational exchanges between international students and U.S. students
  • Provide a variety of cultural activities for learning about the United States and other cultures around the world
  • Promote participation in Morehouse education and civic engagement abroad programs
  • Provide international learning activities related to students’ fields of study
  • Initiate and sustain collaborations between the student scholars of International House and organizations within the college community
  • Develop and sustain relationships between the International House and College alumni and friends throughout the world

As a residential center for experiential learning, student development is fostered in the key areas of self governance, comprehensive life skills and value orientation in community service and leadership.  Students learn to manage and integrate academic excellence, physical and mental health, recreation and leisure time into their daily lives. An added dimension of international cultural enrichment in skills, knowledge, and attitudes distinguishes International House from other residence halls. The following specific learning outcomes exemplify this dimension:

Learning Outcome 1:  Students develop world perspective knowledge of the following that further informs academic programs at Morehouse:

  • International issues and events, historical and contemporary
  • World geography and environment
  • Diverse values, beliefs, ideas and worldviews

Learning Outcome 2:  Students develop the following world perspective skills that enrich the academic programs:

  • Ability to write an abstract, prepare a poster, make an oral presentation
  • Ability to conduct international research in his field
  • Ability to explain his country/culture to others

Learning Outcome 3:  Students develop the following world perspective attitudes that complement the academic programs at Morehouse:

  • Desire for an education and civic engagement experience abroad
  • International social consciousness
  • Sensitivity to U.S. cultural attributes and attitudes
  • Tolerance for ambiguity and unfamiliarity

(ii) I-House Projects

These signature programs link the International House to the learning process at Morehouse. Further, capstone experiences involve national and international students, faculty, and staff in collaborative efforts.

Capstone A is an international research project competition. Students work with faculty advisor-mentors during the Fall semester to develop a proposal abstract for an international research project on an appropriate topic in their chosen fields. Winners will travel to the designated international location during spring break. There, they will participate in a civic engagement project and finalize their research for poster presentations during Family Weekend.

Capstone B consists of poster presentations for Family Weekend. The posters, developed under the direction of faculty advisor-mentors, will display various types of projects with international themes, ranging from scientific research to humanities and creative arts. Typical semester theme programs such as Model United Nations Day, International/Africa Awareness Week, and Kiwanis International service projects establish and reinforce linkages between International House residents, faculty, staff, campus and community organizations, alumni, supporters, and friends around the world.

Additional programs coordinated through International House include the following:

  • Travel exchanges during alternate spring breaks between a culture-rich domestic location for international students and an international destination for U. S. students to experience.
  • Viewings and discussions of films with a world historic perspective
  • Intimate conversations with international scholars and dignitaries
  • International food nights, including the traditional “Hump Wednesday” with an international flair 

(iii) I-House Administration
The I-House, which falls under the auspices of Student Affairs, will have an advisory committee, The I-House Advisory Committee. This Committee will be comprised of the Vice President
for Student Affairs, the Executive Director of the Andrew Young International Center and two representatives each from the faculty and student body. The Advisory Committee will provide oversight for programming in the I-House, and will see that the ongoing programs of cultural enrichment and support of capstone projects are maintained.

W.E.B. DuBois, Scholar and Activist

Timeline for Implementation

A chart detailing the timetable for implementation of this program is presented:

Timetable:  W.E.B. Du Bois International Living-Learning Center

Year One: 2008-2009
 Planning

Year Two: 2009-2010
Implementation

Year Three: 2010-2011 Modification

Year Four: 2011-2012
 Refinement

Year Five: 2012-2013
 Final Assessment

Establish I-House Advisory Committee

Committee Plans Programs:  Research Abroad Competition, Capstone Projects, Kiwanis International Service Projects, Model UN Day With ISO, Family Weekend Presentations, International Research Project Travel, Alternate Spring Break Travel, International/Africa Awareness Week

Make Recommendations On New Programs

Open Freshman Applications

Recruit Faculty For Programs, Research Mentors, Project Judges

Explore Language Submersion Programs, ESL, And Other Academic Program Linkages

 

Continuation Of I-House Programs

Pilot Capstone A Academic Component

At Least One New Academic Component Program Piloted

Annual Report Of I-House Activities Via WEAVEonline

 

 

 

 

Continuation Of Existing I-House Programs

Introduce Capstone B

Introduction Of New Academic Component Program

 Annual Report Of I-House Activities Via WEAVEonline

 

Continuation Of Existing I-House Programs

Annual Report Of I-House Activities Via WEAVEonline

 

Continuation Of Existing I-House Programs

Annual Report Of I-House Activities Via WEAVEonline

Summative Assessment And Report To The President’s Cabinet And Board Of Trustees


c. Assessment Plan  

In order to assess the effectiveness of I-House programming on student learning outcomes as well as on their attitudes and values, new students will be administered an interest and knowledge inventory. This will establish a knowledge and attitudes baseline, and allow for comparisons over time and among different cohorts.  The assessment of the capstone projects will provide a measure of the development of research skills, global awareness, and oral and written presentation skills. The assessment of the participation of I-House residents compared to non-residents in study abroad experiences will provide a measure of the effectiveness of I-House impact on students’ interest in studying abroad.


Alumnus, Maynard Jackson
First African-American Mayor, City of Atlanta
Developed The International Airport That Bears
His Name and During His Second Term Won The
Bid For the Atlanta Centennial Olympic Games 1996

A Logic Model Chart showing elements of program planning is presented followed by an Outcomes Measurement Chart that links desired program outcomes with evaluation measures:


QEP Logic Model W.E.B. Du Bois International Living-Learning Center

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Short and Long Term Outcomes

Programmatic Resources:
Grants
Honoraria
Stipends                                                                                                              Meetings
Travel

Operational Resources:
Equipment
Supplies
Materials

Planning Resources:
Consultants
Travel

Ongoing Programs:

Model United Nations Day (International Students)                                                          

Kiwanis International Service Projects (Circle K Program)                                                       

I-House International Film Series                                                                                                    

International & African Awareness Week           

I-House Hump Wednesday                                

I-House International Food Nights                      

I-House International Chats                                

Capstone A: International Undergraduate Research Project Abroad

Capstone B: Family Weekend Presentations

Review Of Applicable Residential Academic Programs

Ratio Of International Students To US Resident Students

Number Of Faculty I-House Mentors/Liaisons

Student Services I-House Staff

Number Of  Involvements Of International Community And Alumni

Number Of Guest Lecturers And Speakers

 

A Supportive Community For International Students

Educational Exchanges Between International And U.S. Students

Cultural Activities For Learning About The Us  And Other Cultures

Participation In Morehouse Education And Civic Engagement Abroad Programs

International Learning Activities Related To Students’ Fields Of Study

Collaborations Between  Student Scholars Of International House And Organizations Within The College Community

Relationships Between The International House And College Alumni And Friends Worldwide

On-Site Academic Programs

 


QEP Outcomes Measurement: W.E.B. Du Bois International Living-Learning Center

Outcomes

Indicator

Data Source

Data Collection And Analysis

A Supportive Community         For International Students

Educational Exchanges Between International And U.S. Students

Cultural Activities For Learning About The US And Other Cultures

Participation In Morehouse Education And Civic Engagement Abroad Programs

International Learning Activities Related To Students’ Fields Of Study

Collaborations Between Student Scholars Of International House And Organizations Within The College Community

Relationships Between The International House And College Alumni And Friends Worldwide

On-Site Academic Programs

 

Baseline Of Student Interest And Knowledge Of Other Cultures

Changes In The Desire For Education Experiences Abroad

Number Of Students Requesting Information, The Number Of Students Actually Studying Abroad, And The Diversity Of Programs And Regions Represented

Impact Of Information Exchange Forums, Symposia, Lectures, And Presentations By U.S. And International Students

Number Of I-House Programs

Level Of Diversity And Representation

Number Of Programs   
          Reviewed

Criteria For Program Adoption

 

Interest And Knowledge Inventory Survey Report

Evaluation Of Exchanges, Programs, Lectures, Etc.

I-House Advisory Committee Report Of I-House Activities Via WEAVEonline

 

Analysis And Use Of Results From The Interest And Knowledge Inventory Survey

Participant Evaluation Forms

Qualitative Analysis Of Program Effectiveness Via Weaveonline

Summative Assessment And Report To The President’s Cabinet And Board Of Trustees

 


Budget

d. Budget Rationale

Morehouse College’s initial financial investment toward achieving success for this program objective is proposed at $175,000.00 over the five year period.

Year One (2008)

I-House programs will be supported with $10,000 in year one for academic supplies and materials.  The Student International Research Capstone Competition will award travel stipends to eight students who will be accompanied by 2 faculty members for a total of ten participants @ $2,500.00 each.



 

Year One Objectives

Human Resources

Operating Expenses

Programmatic

4. W.E.B. Dubois International House

 

 

 

  1. Supplies and Materials
  2. Student International

       Research
       Capstone  (Materials,Travel & Lodging)

 

10,000

 

25,000


Year Two-Five (2009-2014)

The remaining $140,000 will be allocated per the deliberations and priorities determined by the Committee as a part of their Year One activities.



Goal II  (Continued.)
Objective B:To Initiate a Comprehensive Plan For International Student Recruitment, Retention and Graduation.

Task Force Committee for International Student Recruitment
 
Chair:  Sterling Hudson, Dean Admissions
Gwen Wade, Director, International Student Services & Study Abroad
Terrence Dixon, Associate Director of Admissions
Patricia Pogal, Associate Professor, Spanish
Melvin Rahming, Professor, English
Gloria da Cunha, Professor, Spanish

a. Program Description

Over There: A Plan for International Student Recruitment
           
Enhancements in internationalization would, of necessity, include a significant increase in the numbers of students enrolled in Morehouse from around the world.  For, it is from our international students that we truly learn about the rest of the world and they learn about us. The College’s Strategic Plan envisions the College as an international academic village.  Morehouse, then, must increase the numbers of international students beyond the current level of 3% of the total student population to realize this vision.  This mandate is the work of the Task Force Committee for International Student Recruitment. 

Over half million students are enrolled in higher education institutions in the United States with about 1.2% at the baccalaureate level.  As stated earlier, 3% of the Morehouse student international populations are residents of other countries.  The largest segment of the international student population comes from the Caribbean, led by Trinidad & Tobago and the Bahamas.

In the past, the College’s Office of Admissions has launched modest recruitment efforts worldwide.  Some have not met with the desired level of success.  For example, attendance of students from oil-rich African nations, particularly Nigeria, dwindled over the past twenty years.   Early initiatives, begun in the U. K. in the 1990s, failed to produce the desired presence of Afro-Brits, even though five of the six initial admits earned degrees.  Efforts in Mexico (Oaxaca and Pinotepa) to recruit Afro-Mexican students were never realized.

 From this we have learned many lessons about international student recruitment and the tremendous amount of time and resources that must be committed to this endeavor.  International student recruitment must be an integral part of the College’s overall enrollment management strategy with a significant allocation of institutional support and student support services to address student needs. Most successful college international recruitment efforts have occurred through established relationships with in-country representatives who are native to the targeted county. The College’s commitment must include a vision for how international students will be incorporated into Morehouse.  Moreover, the College must be alert, sensitive and flexible to accommodate changes in resources and/or politics to remain responsive to opportunities and challenges in international student recruitment. 

Program Plan

The task force developed a strategy for international student recruitment, retention and graduation to realize the
goal of an international and diverse student population at Morehouse College.  The plan consists of the following:

  • Strengthen current relationships, while expanding efforts to neighboring countries.  For example, the College will build upon its existing stronghold in the Caribbean, while extending recruitment efforts in the region.  International target markets include:

 
  

  • Develop strong promotional materials that reflect the international milieu of the campus (print, electronic: video,

     website, email, etc.) and the diversity of students

  • Leverage financial aid (primarily academic scholarships) to recruit top international students who may have some resources.  Funding for additional scholarships is included as a part of the Fundraising Strategy (see page  71)
  • Encourage active participation in recruitment efforts from otherworld focused College departments and programs (e.g., Study abroad affiliations, MLK Chapel and International Leadership Development Programs).
  • Train and deploy international faculty as well as students in the recruitment of international students through site visits (where feasible) and through the development of electronic “pen pals”.

 

Operationally, the following steps will be taken in support of the aforementioned goals: 

  • Augment the staff of the Office of Admissions by hiring a full time Assistant Director for international student recruitment
  • Strengthen collaboration between international student recruitment and student affairs to include intensive training in cultures and educational systems
  • Build on existing relationships with alumni and friends of the College in the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to expand into untapped recruitment targets within these geographic regions, and, through additional personal contacts to connect to possibilities for student recruitment in the other targeted countries.
  • Assess current resources available for international students to insure retention and graduation                           

 

Former President Benjamin E. Mays’ Global Vision Led The Way For International Student Recruitment and Study Abroad Programs At Morehouse College.

                                                                                     

Timeline for Implementation

A timetable for accomplishing the objectives articulated for international student recruitment is presented as a chart:

                                                                                       


Timetable: A Comprehensive Plan For International Student Recruitment, Retention And Graduation


Year One: 2008-2009
 Planning

Year Two: 2009-2010
Implementation

Year Three: 2010-2011 Modification

Year Four: 2011-2012
 Refinement

Year Five: 2012-2013
 Final Assessment

Establish The International Recruitment Committee

Recruit Full-Time Assistant Director For International Student Recruitment

Select Out-Source Recruitment Consultants

Determine Desired Percentage/ Composition Of International Students

Determine Four Phases Of Target Market Recruitment Strategy

Establish Criteria/ Funding For International Academic Student Scholarships

Strengthen International Student Recruitment And Student Affairs With Intensive Training In Cultures And Educational Systems

Assess Current Resources To Insure Retention And Graduation

Phase I Target Market Recruitment And Admissions Process

Intensive Training Of Key Admissions And Student Services Staff

Develop Strong Promotional Materials For International Student Recruitment

Annual Report On Activities Of International Recruitment Committee Via WEAVEonline (Including Enrollment And Retention Data)

Phase II Of Target Market Recruitment And Admissions Process

Annual Report On Activities Of International Recruitment Committee Via WEAVEonline (Including Enrollment And Retention Data)

Phase III Of Target Market Recruitment And Admissions Process

Annual Report On Activities Of International Recruitment Committee Via WEAVEonline (Including Enrollment And Retention Data)

 

Phase IV Of Target Market Recruitment And Admissions Process

Summative Assessment And Report To The President’s Cabinet

Annual Report On Activities Of International Recruitment Committee Via WEAVEonline (Including Enrollment And Retention Data)

 


c. Asessment Plan

The effectiveness of the international recruitment effort, the retention of international students, and the graduation rates of international students will be determined from data compiled by the Office of Research on the following:

  • Annual reports on the number of freshman international students by country of origin
  • Annual reports on the number of matriculating international students by class
  • Annual reports on the four and six year graduation rates of international students.

A Logic Model Chart showing elements of program planning is presented followed by an Outcomes Measurement Chart that links desired program outcomes with evaluation measures:

 

 
Morehouse’s Award Winning Model UN Team, Mexico 2008

QEP Logic Model: International Student Recruitment

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Short and Long Term Outcomes

The International Recruitment Committee

Admissions Personnel

Scholarships

Promotional Materials

Travel

Staff Training

Out-Source Recruitment

Strengthen Current Relationships Abroad

Expand To Neighboring Countries

Develop Strong Promotional Materials

Provide Scholarships For International Students

Collaborative Recruitment Efforts Among College Programs

Training For Enrollment Management And Student Support Services

Assessment Of Resources For International Students

Increased Number Of International Students

Increased Retention Of International Students

Increased Diversity Of
Countries Of Origin

Number Of Outsource Contacts

Number Of Student Support Services Staff Dedicated To Internationalization

Number Of Alumni And International Network Of Friends

International Student Recruitment Plan Institutionalized

Increased Number  Of International Students On Scholarship

Increased International Student Population

Increased Retention Of International Students

Increased Rate Of Graduation Of International Students

Increased Exchange Between International And U.S. Students


QEP Outcomes Measurement: International Student Recruitment

Outcomes

Indicator

Data Source

Data Collection And Analysis

International Student Recruitment Plan Institutionalized

Increased Number Of International Students On Scholarship

Increased International Student Population

Increased Retention Of International Students

Increased Rate Of Graduation Of International Students

Increased Exchange Between International And U.S. Students

Number And Quality Of Planning Components

Number Of Scholarships Awarded

Percentage Of Students Reached, Recruited And Admitted

Percentage Of International Student Retention And Graduation

Number And Quality Of Staff Development Training Sessions

Number And Quality Of Promotional Materials

International Student Recruitment Plan

Admissions And Financial Aid Reports

Reports From Out-Source Consultants

Staff Participation Surveys

International Student Satisfaction Surveys

Training Workshop Evaluation Forms

 Annual Report On Activities Of International Recruitment Committee Via WEAVEonline (Including Enrollment And Retention Data)

 

 

Qualitative Analysis Of International Student Recruitment Plan

Staff And Student Workshop Evaluation Forms

Quantification Of Findings From Admissions Reports

International Student Focus Groups

Quantification Of Reports And Documents Via WEAVEonline

Qualitative Analysis Of Program Effectiveness Via WEAVEonline

Summative Assessment And Report To The President’s Cabinet And Board Of Trustees

 

 

 



d. Budget

Budget Rationale

Morehouse College’s initial financial investment toward achieving success for this program objective is proposed at $275,000.00 over the five year period.

Year One (2008)

The international recruitment programs will be supported with $45,000 in year one for the hiring of a full-time International Recruiter.  Travel funds are allocated for this recruiter to, at a minimum, travel abroad seven times.  The costs for international recruitment and promotional materials will be provided by the Office of Admissions and Recruitment.



Year One Objectives

Human Resources

Operating Expenses

Programmatic

5. International Student Recruitment

 

 

 

  1. Recruit International Student Recruiter
  2. Travel

45,000

 

10,000

 

 


Year Two-Five (2009-2014)

The remaining $220,000 will more than likely be allocated the same as year one with the emphasis on international recruitment.




Goal II. (Continued): To provide experiences that will enhance the
understanding of other cultures and nations 

Objective C: To develop a plan to increase the number of Morehouse students applying abroad and establish a Morehouse Education Abroad Program.

Study Abroad Advisory Committee

Chair:  Gregg Hall, Chair, Political Science
Kevin Appleton, V.P. Chief Financial Officer
Gwen Wade,  Director, International Student Services & Study Abroad
Cynthia Hewitt, Assistant Professor, Sociology
Terrence Dixon, Associate Director of Admissions
Eduard Mandell, CEO, Knowledge Exchange Institute (KEI)

a. Program Description

The work of the Study Abroad Advisory Committee involves the consideration of activities to increase the number of Morehouse students studying abroad and to establish Morehouse Education Abroad programs.  The Task Force identified four charges:

1) to identify the necessary resources to improve what is presently in place to enhance education abroad at Morehouse

2) to articulate a sustainable target number of students for education abroad experiences that is based upon its broad impact on global competence.

3) to examine and adopt three or four different education abroad program models/proposals for the Study Abroad Advisory Committee to consider
4) to develop a list of broad suggestions/strategies for increasing resources for sustainability of education abroad as costs and student numbers continue to rise

(i) Current Study Abroad Programs

Study Abroad Programs have been an important and special program of the Morehouse College educational experience for over fifty years.  There are two ways in which students access study abroad experiences.  They may select an individual experience or participate in one of the Morehouse based programs abroad.

For the past two years, many of the individual study abroad programs have been managed through the Andrew Young Center (AYC), whose mission is to advance the College’s international profile. The Center’s activities are the foundation of the College’s study abroad efforts.  The Center’s three person staff administers over 250 study abroad and exchange programs available to Morehouse students.

The services of AYC have expanded to meet the growing interest in international opportunities among the Morehouse community.  In just two years, study abroad numbers have increased from an average of 30 students studying abroad to over 153 students who study abroad annually, the highest in the College’s history and a number that continues to increase. The staffing needs of the AYC are among the critical questions the Sub-Committee considered.

The following programs are current Morehouse based study abroad experiences that the College has supported in the past and will plan for their continuation:
 

  • Guanajuato, Mexico (Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, Dr. Patricia Pogal):  This study abroad program is the College’s first and only “proprietary” overseas program.  Originally, the program was established in Oaxaca, Mexico over a decade ago.  As a result of severe federal government-issued travel advisories, the program was relocated to Guanajuato in 2006.  Currently, Dr. Pogal administers this summer program in Mexico. An average of 20-30 students participates in the program each summer, along with two accompanying faculty members in this credit-course. 
  • Summer Economic Development Course in South Africa (Division of Business and Economics, Dr. Glenwood Ross): For the past several summers, Dr. Ross has led student delegations from Morehouse College and Georgia State University on a study-tour to South Africa to examine a range of issues related to economic development on the Continent.  Students participating in this program do not receive credit for the experience, and most of the students are from one of Dr. Ross’ previously taught courses.  
  • The International Conference on Caribbean Literature  (ICCL): The International Conference on Caribbean Literature (ICCL) was founded in July, 1997, by Dr. Melvin B. Rahming (former Hugh M. Gloster Professor of English and former Chair of the Department of English at Morehouse College, Atlanta, Georgia) and Dr. Jorge Roman-Lagunas (Director of the Center for International Studies at Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, Indiana) for the purpose of promoting global understanding of Caribbean culture.  Selected students who are enrolled in Caribbean Literature -- ENG 457: The Caribbean Novel annually have the opportunity to show the high quality of scholarship that Morehouse encourages through their presentation of research papers for this conference. After the conference, these students will be assigned projects designed to excite other students about the rewards and challenges of living briefly in another nation and another culture.

Program Plan

Expansion and enhancement of the study abroad administration will include additional staff support for the Andrew Young Center; the systematic addition of new education abroad programs and a plan for sustainability for student merit-based tuition scholarships and study abroad travel stipends.  The sustainability of current Morehouse based study abroad programs and seed money for new Morehouse based education abroad programs will be provided for in the College’s Capital Campaign. It is anticipated that Morehouse Study Abroad and Education Abroad sites will be funded from external sources.

(ii) Formation of a Study Abroad Advisory Committee

The Study Abroad Advisory Committee will provide oversight and coordination of study abroad programs. This committee will work on strengthening the existing study abroad programs with a more formal marketing strategy, institutional support, and faculty involvement across the divisions, and consider the feasibility of establishing new study abroad sites, some of which are described below.

 

(iii) New Programs and Proposed Education Abroad Programs

  • Science and Mathematics Exchange Agreement in Tanzania (Division of Science and Mathematics) The AYC and the Division are collaborating on a new international exchange program between Morehouse and the University of Dar Es Salaam in Tanzania.  This new bi-directional exchange agreement (MOU) will create opportunities for Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics majors from Morehouse and the University of Dar Es Salaam to study one semester abroad.  The scheduled program start date is spring 2009.
  • Business & Economics Exchange Agreement in Troyes, France (Division of Business and Economics): The Division and the AYC have partnered to establish an exchange agreement with the University of Troyes in France.  In Fall 2008, the first group of Morehouse students will study for the semester in France. 
  • African American and Black British Program in London:The AYC and the Knowledge Exchange Institute (KEI) are currently collaborating on the establishment of a new summer study abroad program in London, England that will examine a multitude of issues related to both the African American and Black British experience. 
  • Morehouse Pan African Global Experience (MPAGE): Dr. Cynthia Hewitt, in coordination with other dedicated Morehouse faculty under the auspices of the Salzburg Seminar, is developing this education abroad program.  This program proposes to offer courses that would be recognized across academic institutions as equal to on-campus instruction.  The program would be touring one country primarily with Pan-African tours to neighboring countries – the first site to be Ghana, with excursion to Togo/Benin.  The program would be funded through tuition (plus fees to cover living expenses and activities).   
  • Consortium Study Abroad Model: The sub-committee has examined the financial merits of the College entering into more study abroad consortium agreements with study abroad service providers, such as KEI and International Human Rights Exchange (IHRE).  The AYC has negotiated a number of these types of agreements already and these relationships are of great assistance in terms of marketing and logistical support.  
  • The University of Hawaii at Manoa Minority Serving Institutions (MSI) Program:  Morehouse will build upon its existing relationship with the MSI Program to collaborate with study abroad programs in Asia and the Pacific.  These programs will provide support for students studying in the College’s emerging Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Program.

Timeline For Implementation

The following timetable chart describes the activities for the Study Abroad and Education Abroad Programs:



  

Timetable: Morehouse Study and Education Abroad

Year One: 2008-2009
 Planning

Year Two: 2009-2010
Implementation

Year Three: 2010-2011 Modification

Year Four: 2011-2012
 Refinement

Year Five: 2012-2013
 Final Assessment

Formation Of A Faculty Study Abroad Advisory Committee

Staff Enhancements To The Andrew Young Center

Development Of A Sustainability Plan For Existing Study Abroad Programs

Feasibility Study Of Morehouse College Education Abroad Programs

Number Of Students Engaged In Study Abroad Above Year One

Faculty Study Abroad Advisory Committee Continues To Evaluate Education Abroad Sites

Annual Report On Activities Of Study Abroad Advisory Committee Via WEAVEonline

Number Of Students Engaged In Study Abroad Above Year Two

Award First Round Of Study Abroad Tuition And Travel Scholarships

Faculty Study Abroad Advisory Committee Continues To Evaluate Education Abroad Sites

Annual Report On Activities Of Study Abroad Advisory Committee Via WEAVEonline

Number Of Students Engaged In Study Abroad Award Above Year Three

Second Round Of Study Abroad Tuition And Travel Scholarships

Faculty Study Abroad Advisory Committee Continues To Evaluate Education Abroad Sites

Annual Report On Activities Of Study Abroad Advisory Committee Via WEAVEonline

Number Of Students Engaged In Study Abroad Above Year Four

 Third Round Of Study Abroad Tuition And Travel Scholarships

Annual Report On Activities Of Study Abroad Advisory Committee Via WEAVEonline

Summative Assessment And Report To The President’s Cabinet

 



c. Assessment Plan

The assessment of this program will be formative and summative and will factor in quantitative measures as well as qualitative.  The assessment will center on the overall QEP goal of global competence and the extent to which the study abroad and education abroad experiences impact the level of intercultural understanding of Morehouse students.  Additionally, the program will evaluate its effectiveness in integrating and leveraging its activities with other internationalization efforts on campus as well as its effectiveness in managing the global partners and institutional collaborations with whom Morehouse College brokers its education abroad programs.
Evaluation Design
The evaluation plan of this program will be guided by the logic model and outcomes measurement system in which program planning and design are depicted in a logic model and linked to a cycle of evaluation for outcomes measurement.  The reports and findings generated from this process will be fed into the WEAVEonline system for overall assessment.

A Logic Model Chart showing elements of program planning is presented followed by an Outcomes Measurement Chart that links desired program outcomes with evaluation measures:

 

                         Inauguration of President Robert Franklin


  

QEP Logic Model: Morehouse Education And Study Abroad Program

  

Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Short and Long-Term Outcomes

Study Abroad Advisory Committee

Consultants

Travel

Tuition And Travel Scholarships

Study Abroad Coordinator

Form Study Abroad Advisory Committee

Marketing Strategy For Study Abroad

Funding And Sustainability Plan For Study Abroad

Award Scholarships For Study Abroad

Create/Support New Education Abroad Programs

Hire Study Abroad Coordinator

Increase Annual Numbers Of Students Studying Abroad

Number Of Faculty, Staff And Student Participants

Number Of Universities Abroad Partnerships

Number Of  Institutional Development Staff And AYC Staff Dedicated To Education Abroad

Study Abroad Advisory Committee Effectiveness

Annual  Increase Of Students Studying Abroad

Increased Support Of Existing Study Abroad Programs

Development Of New Study And Education Abroad Programs

Increased Scholarship Support For Students Studying Abroad

Funding And Sustainability Plan

Staff Enhancements And Increased Productivity Of AYC


QEP Outcome measures: Morehouse Education and Study abroad

  

  

Outcomes

Indicator

Data Source

Data Collection And Analysis

Study Abroad Advisory Committee Effectiveness

Annual Increase Of Students Studying Abroad

Increased Support Of Existing Study Abroad Programs

Development Of New Study And Education Abroad Programs

Increased Scholarship Support For Students Studying Abroad

Funding And Sustainability Plan

Staff Enhancements And Increased Productivity Of AYC

Number Of Meetings

Number Of Recommendations

Number Of Students Studying Abroad

Number Of New Study/Education Abroad Programs

Number Of Planning Documents For Sustainability

Number Of Staff Hires For AYC

Amount Of Funding Received And Allocated

Number Of Scholarships Awarded

QEP Reports

Advisory Committee Minutes

AYC Annual Report

Sustainability Document

Student Award Letters

Memoranda Of Agreement/Understanding

Annual Report On Activities Of Study Abroad Advisory Committee Via WEAVEonline

 

Quantitative And Qualitative Analysis Of Data Input Into Weave Online

Annual Report On Activities Of Study Abroad Advisory Committee Via WEAVEonline

Summative Assessment And Report To The President’s Cabinet And Board Of Trustees

  

       


 

d. Budget

Budget Rationale

Morehouse College’s initial financial investment toward achieving success for this program objective is proposed at $235,000.00 over the five year period.

Year One (2008)
A new position, Study Abroad Coordinator, is proposed at $45,000/year for the AYC to strengthen the present study abroad office, and allow for expansion of the study abroad program’s administration. 

The College now sends about 153 students abroad per year. If the total student enrollment is set at 2800, this would mean that approximately 6% of the student body engages in study abroad.

An amount of $2,000.00 is budgeted for the Study Abroad Advisory Committee’s activities.


Year One Objectives

Human Resources

Operating Expenses

Programmatic

6. Increase Study Abroad Activity   &  Education Abroad Programming

 

 

 

  1. Recruit Director of Study Abroad
  2. Appoint Study Abroad Advisory Committee

45,000

 

2,000

 

 


 

Year Two-Five (2009-2014)

The remaining $188,000 will more than likely be allocated the same as year one.

It is anticipated that Morehouse Study Abroad and Education Abroad sites will be funded from external sources.

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