The King Collection

Supporters


THE CORPORATE and philanthropic communities have generously stepped forward to support Morehouse's efforts to use the Collection to educate and train the next generation of global leaders. The Morehouse King Collection gratefully recognizes the generous support of its institutional sponsors which include Goldman Sachs, the Ford Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In 2007, Goldman Sachs donated $2 million to endow The Goldman Sachs Leadership Chair in Civil and Human Rights at Morehouse.

In 2007 the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation gave $2 million to help manage the preservation, maintenance and security of the Collection. This contribution also helped endow a directorship and fund infrastructure and initial programmatic needs.

In 2008, The Ford Foundation donated $1 million to support academic programming and community outreach activities around the Collection.

"Our visions - the Foundation's, the College's and certainly Dr. King's - are synchronous, and we are both proud and fortunate to be in partnership with a world leader in strategic philanthropy;' said President Franklin. "This support will enable the Morehouse College Martin Luther King Jr. Collection to expand programming, research and outreach activities in substantive and innovative ways."

The Goldman Sachs Leadership Chair in Civil and Human Rights
In 2006, Morehouse College received the 10,000 piece collection of Martin Luther King Jr.'s writings, books, and personal memorabilia. Less than a year later, the College received its' first foundation support for the Collection from Goldman Sachs, a leading global investment banking, securities and investment management firm. Goldman Sachs donated $2 million to endow The Goldman Sachs Leadership Chair in Civil and Human Rights at the College.

"An important element of Dr. King's teachings is a call for each individual to feel a sense of responsibility for the community as a whole," said Lloyd C. Blankfein, chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Goldman Sachs. "We try to apply this lesson of leadership and accountability not only at our firm, but in the communities in which we live and work.

The first academic to hold the Chair is the current director of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection, Dr. Vickie Crawford.

"Goldman Sachs will work closely with the Chair, as well as with the faculty and administration of Morehouse," said Blankfein, "to develop programs both on campus and at the firm around the theme of leadership as exemplified by the life of Dr. King."

The support from Goldman Sachs represents yet another significant milestone in the ongoing partnership with the firm. Goldman Sachs has actively recruited at Morehouse for a number of years and maintains several Morehouse alumni on its professional staff.

Historically, the connection between Goldman Sachs and Morehouse dates back nearly 100 years. Both institutions, founded in the late 1800s — Morehouse in 1867 and Goldman Sachs in 1869 — would provide fertile ground for two trailblazers in the movement for civil and human rights in this country. John Hope, the first black president of Morehouse and Walter Sachs, the son of one of the founders of Goldman Sachs, played significant leadership roles in founding the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

In 1906, Hope joined W. E. B. Du Bois and others in the Niagara movement. He was the only college president to participate in the protest meeting, which culminated with the founding of the NAACP. He later served on the advisory board for the group. Shortly after, in 1909, Walter Sachs served as the first treasurer and chairman of the finance committee for the NAACP. An early figure in the civil rights movement, he helped the organization establish special funds to promote an anti-lynching crusade and take legal action against discrimination.

Headquartered in New York, Goldman Sachs provides a wide range of services to a substantial and diversified client base, and maintains offices in London, Frankfurt, Tokyo, Hong Kong and other major financial centers around the world.