BIO 320 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY www.morehouse.edu/facstaff/lblumer/BIO320

 

Autumn Semester 2010, 11:00 - 11:50AM MWF LR 1 Nabrit-Mapp-McBay

Instructor:  Lawrence Blumer, 302 Hope Hall, e-mail: lblumer@morehouse.edu

Office Hours:  MWF 1-2 pm and by appointment  phone: 404-653-7873

Texts:  Economy of Nature.  R.E. Ricklefs.  6th edition.  Freeman. 2008.  (EON)

             Principles of Ecology Lecture Outline and Study Guide.

 

Lecture

Date

Subject          

Reading (EON)

 

1

W

25-Aug

Introduction to Course

pp 1-22

2

F

27-Aug

Ecological Limiting Factors

pp 23-60

 

 

 

 

 

3

M

30-Aug

Ecological Limiting Factors

pp 61-78

4

W

1-Sep

Ecology and Evolution

pp 113-156

5

F

3-Sep

Ecology and Evolution

pp 267-301

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

6-Sep

Labor Day Holiday – No Classes

 

6

W

8-Sep

Ecology and Evolution

pp 180-197

7

F

10-Sep

Ecology and Evolution

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

M

13-Sep

Ecology and Evolution

 

9

W

15-Sep

Ecology and Evolution

 

 

F

17-Sep

Examination #1 on lectures 1-9

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

M

20-Sep

Speciation and Macro-evolution

pp 545-569

11

W

22-Sep

Phenotypic Variation

pp 128-131

12

F

24-Sep

Populations and Demography

pp 198-211

 

 

 

 

 

13

M

27-Sep

Population Growth

pp 222-236

14

W

29-Sep

Life Table Analysis

 

15

F

1-Oct

Population Limits

 

 

16

M

4-Oct

Population Limits

pp 236-247

17

W

6-Oct

Population Limits

 

 

F

8-Oct

Examination #2 on lectures 10-17

 

 

 

 

18

M

11-Oct

Competition

pp 328-345

19

W

13-Oct

Competition

 

20

F

15-Oct

Competition

 

 

 

 

 

 

21

M

18-Oct

Competition Models

 

22

W

20-Oct

Competition Models

 

23

F

22-Oct

Competition Experiments

 


 

Lecture

Date

Subject          

Reading (EON)

 

24

M

25-Oct

Predation and Herbivory

pp 287-301

25

W

27-Oct

Predation and Herbivory

 

26

F

29-Oct

Predation Models

pp 302-327

 

 

 

 

 

27

M

1-Nov

Predation Models

 

 

W

3-Nov

Examination #3 on lectures 18-27

 

28

F

5-Nov

Community Structure

pp 369-391

 

 

 

 

 

29

M

8-Nov

Community Change

pp 392-410

30

W

10-Nov

Biodiversity and Biogeography

pp 411-439

31

F

12-Nov

Trophic Structure

pp 463-481

 

 

 

 

 

32

M

15-Nov

Trophic Energy Efficiency

 

33

W

17-Nov

Nutrient Cycles

pp 482-504

34

F

19-Nov

Nutrient Cycles

 

 

 

 

 

 

35

M

22-Nov

Carbon and Climate Change

pp 570-588

 

W

24-Nov

Pre-Thanksgiving Holiday-No Meeting

 

 

F

26-Nov

Thanksgiving Holiday – No Classes

 

 

 

 

 

 

36

M

29-Nov

Carbon and Climate Change

 

37

W

1-Dec

Carbon and Climate Change

 

           

Final Examination, Monday December 6, 1:00 – 3:00 pm,

Nabrit-Mapp-McBay LR 1

(Part 1 on Lectures 28-37, Part 2 on Lectures 1-27)

Examination Dates

           

Friday, September 17 

Examination #1

Friday, October 8

Examination #2

Wednesday, November 3

Examination #3

Monday, December 6

Final Examination

 

Course Objectives

 

            This course will give you comprehensive introduction to the science of ecology, the study of interactions between organisms and their environment.  All major areas of ecology will be considered including:  Environmental limiting factors on plants and animals, life history patterns, demography and population growth, evolutionary ecology, interactions between organisms such as competition, predation, and mutualism, community and ecosystem ecology, and global systems ecology.  This course addresses ecological and evolutionary theories as well as the empirical evidence bearing on those theories.  The human implications of ecological phenomena and the consequences of human modification of our environment will also be addressed.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Evaluation

 

            Your grade in this course will be based on three in-class lecture examinations, and a comprehensive final examination.  Examination questions will be drawn from the subjects we actually address in lectures, but it is essential that you keep-up with the reading assignments.  The examinations will consist of multiple choice, short answer, and short essay type questions.  There will be an emphasis on problem solving.

 

 

Course Grading

           

Three in-class examinations, 100 pts. each

300 points

Final Examination (comprehensive)

200 points

 

 

Total =

500 points

                                                                                                                                               

Letter grades will be assigned as described below:

           

A 

=

90

to

100%

A-

=

88

to

89%

B+

=

86

to

87%

B

=

80

to

85%

B-

=

78

to

79%

C+

=

76

to

77%

C

=

70

to

75%

C-

=

68

to

69%

D+

=

66

to

67%

D

=

60

to

65%

D-

=

58

to

59%

F

=

57% and less

 

 

 

Attendance Policy

 

            Absences will not be excused unless permitted in writing by the Academic Dean or the Dean of Students.  No exceptions.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.  Class will begin promptly on the hour.

 

Problem Sets

 

            Review Problems and answer keys are included in the on-line Course Pack: Principles of Ecology Lecture Outline and Study Guide  Prior to each of the examinations, you should complete all the review problems associated with that part of the course.   These problems sets are past examination questions that will help you prepare for examinations.

 


Academic Honesty (Plagiarism)

 

            All the work that you submit in this course must be your own.  Copying the work of others and submitting it as your own is dishonest and will not be tolerated (this includes problem set answer keys).  Copying on an examination is an obvious example of academic dishonesty.  Submitting work copied from a group effort is unacceptable when individual grades are to be given.  Working with your fellow students on laboratory studies, problem sets or computer models is fine, but the work you actually submit must be the result of your own efforts and must be written in your own words.  Paraphrasing the work of others is not acceptable.  At the very least, dishonesty will result in a grade of zero for the assignment or examination, and a report to the Dean of Students.

 

 

Department of Biology Mission

      Provide students with a fundamental knowledge of Biology.

      Prepare students for and assist them in entering graduate and professional school, and the workforce.

      Strengthen students' reading, writing and quantitative skills.

      Develop students' analytical reasoning and creative thinking skills.

      Expose students to contemporary research techniques in Biology and enhance their understanding of the Scientific Method.

      Conduct meritorious research in the field of Biology.

      Acquaint students with the history of Biology, including the contributions of Black scientists.

      Engender an appreciation among students of the social and economic implications of discoveries in Biology.

      Build students' awareness of ethical and moral issues related to basic tenets in Biology.

 

Disability Accommodation

 

Morehouse College is committed to equal opportunity in education for all students, including those with documented disabilities. Students with disabilities or those who suspect they have a disability must register with the Office of Disability Services (ODS) in order to receive accommodations.  Students currently registered with the ODS are required to present their Disability Services Accommodation Letter to faculty immediately upon receiving the accommodation.  If you have any questions, contact the Office of Disability Services, 104 Sale Hall Annex, Morehouse College, 830 Westview Dr. S.W., Atlanta, GA 30314, (404) 215-2636, FAX: (404) 215-2749.

 

Disclaimer

 

This syllabus is not a contract.  The instructor reserves the right to modify it at his discretion.