BIO 200G Science and Society (Pilot Core Curriculum)

 

Fall Semester 2009

 

(syllabus also available at courses website via Tigernet BIO 200 link)

 

 

Section 01, Room 311, Hope Hall (starting October 19, Room 141 Dansby Hall) Monday and Wednesday 9:00 – 10:50

 

 

Instructors: 

 

Lawrence Blumer, Room 302, Hope Hall

                  Telephone:  404 653-7873

                  Office Hours:  MWF 13:00-14:00 and by appointment

E-mail:  lblumer@morehouse.edu

 

Willie Rockward, Room 113, Dansby Hall

         Telephone:  404 614-6036

Office Hours:  MWF 11:00 – Noon and by appointment

         E-mail: wrockwar@morehouse.edu

 

 

 

 

Required Text:

Integrated Science, 4th edition (2008)

Tillery, Enger and Ross.  McGraw Hill

 

SimBiotic Software Package for BIO 200

 

Laboratory handouts and other course materials will be available for downloading at the course website via Tigernet BIO 200 link.

 

 


 

Meeting  Date

                      Topic                                         

Reading

 Laboratory Activities

1

W

26-Aug

Introduction:  Purpose and Scope of Course

 

Diagnostic Examination

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

M

31-Aug

Energy, Climate and Pollution

What is the most dangerous pollution?

How does energy and matter flow in nature?

62-71, 94-97

561-564

Design and start experiment on animal responses to their environment (1A)

 

3

 

 

W

 

 

2-Sep

 

 

Is Earth over-populated?

 

 

584-588

 

 

 

 

Collect data on animal responses to their environment (1A)

 

Modeling population growth and human population growth (2A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

7-Sep

Labor Day - No Classes

 

 

4

 

W

 

9-Sep

 

How do populations grow?

 

584-588

 

Population growth simulation workbook (Isle Royale) due 16-Sep in class

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

M

 

14-Sep

 

Where do we get energy and for what purpose?

 

62-71

 

Exploring non-carbon energy resources (3A)

6

 

W

 

16-Sep

 

What is global warming and what causes it?

 

578-579

 

Exploring energy efficiency (4A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

M

 

 

21-Sep

 

 

What can we do about climate change?

 

Examination #1 at 311 Hope Hall

(on meetings 1-6)

131

 

 

 

1-hour limit

8

 

W

 

23-Sep

 

Science and Medicine

What causes multi-drug resistance in bacteria?

 

505-515

 

 

Evolution simulation workbook (Darwinian Snails) due 30-Sep in class

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

M

 

28-Sep

 

How do organisms change over time?

What is the purpose of life?

505-515

 

How do organisms change over time?

What is the purpose of life?

10

 

W

 

30-Sep

 

Reproduction and information

 

667-674

490-492

What and where is the information in cells? (5A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

M

 

5-Oct

 

Reproduction and information

 

626-629

656-664

Reproduction and information

 

12

 

W

 

7-Oct

 

Cancer

 

493

 

How is biological information transmitted in humans and how is it expressed? (6A)

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

M

12-Oct

Immune System, HIV and AIDS

 

 

 

14

 

W

 

14-Oct

 

Examination #2 at 311 Hope Hall

(on meetings 7-13)

 

1-hour limit

 

Exchange with Dr. Rockward

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Meeting  Date

                  Topic                                                Reading

Laboratory Activities

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19-Oct

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science, the Universe, & our World

1 What is Science?

Objects and Properties through

  Science, Non-science, and Pseudoscience

 

 

 

 

1-24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer multiple choice, questions, & exercises

Pages 22-23:  MC: 1-10 and Q: 1,4,7,8,10

Page 24:  E: Group B -- 1,4,6,9

 

Lab 1: Measuring the Properties of Objects

A.         Volume of objects

16

 

 

W

 

 

21-Oct

 

 

1 What is Science? (continued)

 

 

 

 

 

Lab 1: Measuring the Properties of Objects

B.         Density

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26-Oct

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Motion

Describing Motion through

  Newtons Law of Gravitation

 

 

 

 

 

25-54

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer multiple choice, questions, & exercises

Pages 52-53:  MC: 1-12 and Q: 1,2,4,6-10

Pages 53-54:  E: Group B – 1,2,4,6,7,10

 

Lab 2: Measuring the Motion of Objects

1.     Free Fall Motion

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28-Oct

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Energy

Work through Energy Tomorrow

 

Read Chapters 12, 13 and 14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

55-74

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer multiple choice, questions, & exercises

Pages 72-73:  MC: 1-12 and Q: 1,2,4,5,6,8-12

Pages 73-74:  E: Group B – 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,10,12

 

Lab 3: Measuring the Energy of Objects

1.     Potential & Kinetic Energy

2.     Energy Conversion

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2-Nov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 The Universe

The Night Sky through Galaxies

 

 

 

 

 

13 The Solar System

Planets, Moons, and Other Bodies through

  Origin of the Solar System

 

 

267-286

 

 

 

 

 

 

187-310

 

 

 

Answer multiple choice and questions

Pages 285-286: MC:1-10 and Q: 1,2,5,7,9,12

 

Lab 4: From Galaxy to Galaxy

1.     Model our Galaxy and its neighbor

 

Page 309: MC:1-8 and Q: 1,4,7,9,11,12

 

Lab 5: Our Solar System and its Planets

     Model our Solar System

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

 

W

 

4-Nov

 

14 Earth in Space: Our World

Shape & Size of Earth through

  The Earth-Moon System

 

Review for Exam #3 (10-15 minutes)

Read Chapters 4, 6 and 7

311-332

 

 

 

 

 

Answer multiple choice and questions

Pages 330-31: MC:1-12 and Q: 2,4,6,7,9,10

 

Lab 6: Our World – the Earth

     Model the Earth-Moon system

Meeting  Date

Topic                                                                    Reading

Laboratory Activities

21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9-Nov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Examination #3 at 141 Dansby Hall

(on meeting 15-20)

 

Science & Technology

4 Heat and Temperature

The Kinetic Molecular Theory through

  Thermodynamics

 

 

 

 

 

75-102

 

 

1-hour time limit

 

Answer multiple choice, questions, & exercises

Page 100:  MC: 1-12 and Q: 1,4,5,9,11

Pages 101-102:  E: Group B – 1,2,3,5,8,10

 

Lab 7A: Turn up the Heat

Converting the temperature scales

 

22

 

 

W

 

 

11-Nov

 

 

4 Heat and Temperature (continued)

 

 

 

Lab 7B: Turn up the Heat (continued)

     Measuring the Heat capacity of Metals

 

23

M

16-Nov

6 Electricity

Electric Charge through

  Electrical Power and Work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

125-137

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer multiple choice, questions, & exercises

Pages 149-150: MC:1-12 and Q: 1,2,4,5,6

Page 151:  E: Group B – 2,3,5,7,8,9,10

 

Lab 8A: Electric Circuits and Lemon Battery

24

W

18-Nov

6 Electricity (continued)

  Magnetism

 

137-151

 

 

Lab 8B: Faradays Law and the Compass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23-Nov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 Light

Sources of Light and Properties of Light

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

153-166

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answer multiple choice, questions, & exercises

Page 177: MC:1-12 and Q: 1,2,4,5,7,8,9,10,12

Page 178: E: Group B – 1,2,3,4,5,6,8,9

 

Lab 9: Properties of Light

Reflection and Refraction

 

W

25-Nov

No Class Meeting - Happy Thanksgiving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26

 

 

 

M

 

 

 

30-Nov

 

 

 

7 Light (continued)

 

Review for Exam #4 (10-20 minutes)

 

 

Lab 11: Properties of Light

Total Internal Reflection

 

Review for Examination #4

27

 

 

W

 

 

2-Dec

 

 

Exam #4 at 141 Dansby Hall

(on meetings 21-26)

 

 

1-hour limit

Review for Final Examination

Examination Schedule

 

 

 

 

 

W

26-Aug

Diagnostic Examination, Hope 311

 

 

 

 

 

M

21-Sep

Examination 1, Hope 311

 

 

 

 

 

W

14-Oct

Examination 2, Hope 311

 

 

 

 

 

M

9-Nov

Examination 3, Dansby 141

 

 

 

 

 

W

2-Dec

Examination 4, Dansby 141

 

 

 

 

 

W

9-Dec

Final Examination, Dansby 141, 10:30-12:30

 

Course Objectives

 

            BIO 200G is an interdisciplinary topical introduction to science and its societal implications.  Lecture and laboratory activities are integrated in a studio format in which students will work with a given faculty member to both discuss science and perform scientific investigations.  The course is team taught by faculty from Physics and Biology and will address four topics:  The Origin of the Universe, Energy, Climate and Pollution, Science and Medicine, and Science and Technology.

 

Course Evaluation

 

Your grade in this course will be based on your combined performance on examinations, laboratory assignments, and class attendance.  At the completion of each of the four topic modules, there will be an examination, and a comprehensive final examination given during the final examination period.  A comprehensive Diagnostic Examination will also be given at the beginning of the semester.  The Diagnostic Examination is a required part of this course for which you will receive one extra credit point per correct answer (applied to your total course score).  All examination questions will be drawn from the subjects we actually address in class, so punctual class attendance is required.  The examinations will consist of multiple-choice questions.  Questions will emphasize problem solving.

 

            Laboratory assignments will consist of written experiment summaries and/or computer simulation workbooks.  The written experiment summaries will be limited to three-pages typed double-spaced (see grading rubric as a guide on page 8).  Each laboratory assignment will be worth 50 points.

 

Course Grading

           

Four one-hour examinations, 100 pts. each

400 points

Class participation and attendance

100 points

Comprehensive Final Examination

100 points

Laboratory Assignments (eight), 50 pts. each

400 points

Total =

1000 points

 

Letter grades will be assigned as described below:

           

A+

=

98

to

100%

A

=

93

to

97%

A-

=

90

to

92%

B+

=

87

to

89%

B

=

82

to

86%

B-

=

79

to

81%

C+

=

76

to

78%

C

=

65

to

75%

D

=

56

to

64%

F

=

55% and less


Attendance Policy

 

            Absences will not be excused unless permitted in writing by the Academic

Dean or the Dean of Students.  No exceptions.  More than four unexcused absences will result in a failing grade.  Class will begin promptly at the scheduled time.  Attendance will be taken each day by means of a sign-in sheet.  Official excuses for absences must be presented to your instructor within five days of returning to class.

 

Policy on Absences from Examinations

 

As stated in the course syllabus, all students are required to take 4 scheduled hour examinations and the final examination.  Absences from examinations will be handled as follows:

 

An unexcused absence from any examination will yield a score of zero for that examination grade. 

 

An excused absence (a written excuse from the Academic Dean or the Dean of Students) from a lecture examination will be handled as follows:

 

            The first excused absence from an hour examination will simply excuse you from that examination, there will be no make-up examination.  Your grade will be based on the remaining examinations including the final examination.

 

            The second excused absence from an hour examination will result in a withdrawal from the course (grade W).  If you know in advance that you will miss a scheduled examination, speak to your instructor prior to that examination date.

 

 

Policy on Absences from Class Meetings

 

 

The Laboratory Assignments that you submit must be for studies that you actually conducted and for which you actively participated in data collection.  Consequently, if you are absent from class and did not conduct a given experimental study, then you will not be permitted to submit that study as one of your assignments.  This policy will apply whether your absence is excused or unexcused.  If you miss all the experimental studies in a given topic module, you will be withdrawn from the course.


Classroom Conduct

 

      Class will begin promptly at the scheduled time.  Late arrivals will not be permitted.

      No eating or drinking.  No chewing (gum, tobacco). No smoking.

      No hats or inappropriate clothing.

      No cell phones or unauthorized technology including but not limited to camcorders, hand-held devices.

      Disrespectful behavior will not be tolerated.  This includes tardiness, disruptions and sleeping.

      Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated and such infractions will be handled severely.

      Show your work on all assigned exercises, quizzes, lab reports, and exams.

      No work will be accepted in pencil.  Pencil usage will constitute a zero for that particular assignment.

      Documentation for excused absents are due immediately upon returning to class.  The student absentee policy will be enforced (see Attendance Policy above). 

      Any student with a disability who requires classroom accommodations must contact Office of Disabilities Services (ODS) to receive an accommodations letter. Accommodations will be considered only after receipt of this letter. Students needing accommodations are encouraged to contact the ODS at the beginning of the semester, as accommodations will not be applied retroactively to coursework that has already been completed.

 

Academic Honesty (Plagiarism)

 

            All the work that you submit in this course must be your own.  Copying the work of others and submitting it as your own is dishonest and will not be tolerated (this includes problem set answer keys).  Copying on an examination is an obvious example of academic dishonesty.  Submitting work copied from a group effort is unacceptable when individual grades are to be given.  Working with your fellow students on laboratory studies, problem sets or computer simulations is fine, but the work you actually submit must be the result of your own efforts and must be written in your own words.  Paraphrasing the work of others is not acceptable.  At the very least, dishonesty will result in a grade of zero for the assignment or examination, and a report to the Dean of Students.

 

Disability Accommodation

 

Morehouse College is committed to equal opportunity in education for all students, including those with documented disabilities. Students with disabilities or those who suspect they have a disability must register with the Office of Disability Services (ODS) in order to receive accommodations.  Students currently registered with the ODS are required to present their Disability Services Accommodation Letter to faculty immediately upon receiving the accommodation.  If you have any questions, contact the Office of Disability Services, 104 Sale Hall Annex, Morehouse College, 830 Westview Dr. S.W., Atlanta, GA 30314, (404) 215-2636, FAX: (404) 215-2749.

 

Disclaimer

 

This syllabus is not a contract.  The instructors reserve the right to modify it at their discretion.

 


Laboratory Writing Assignment Evaluation Rubric

 

 

PILOT CORE, SCIENCE AND SOCIETY, BIO 200G                                Name_______________________­________

Morehouse College, Fall 2009

 

Experimental Study Title: _________________________________________________________

 

 

Writing Assignment Evaluation (50 points possible)

 

 

Introduction and Title (15 points)        _____

 

Title:    

Descriptive of both the question and the system being studied:  5 point

Descriptive of either the question or the system:        3 points

Title not descriptive, such as Experiment #1 or missing:  no points

 

Introduction:      

Statement of question addressed, statement of hypotheses to be tested, and context for the current study provided:  10 points

Statement of question and alternative hypotheses given, but context missing:  6 points

Statement of alternative hypotheses missing:  2 points

Statement of question missing:  no points

 

Findings (15 points)    _____

 

Statistical summary of findings (average values, total counts for each treatment) in prose and in the form of graphs or tables, and a prose description of the findings:  15 points

Statistical summary of findings (average values, total counts for each treatment) in prose and in the form of graphs or tables, but no prose description of the findings:  7 points

Statistical findings only in the form of graphs or tables:  5 points

Raw data presented without statistical summaries:  no points

           

Interpretation (20 points)         _____

 

Interpretation of results to reject hypotheses and address the question posed in the Introduction, and provide a broader context on the meaning of the findings:  20 points

Interpretation of results to reject hypotheses and address the question posed in the Introduction, but no context on the meaning of the findings provided:  10 points

Interpretation of results to reject hypotheses provided but the question posed in the Introduction not addressed:  6 points

Interpretation of results to reject hypotheses and address the question posed in the Introduction not provided:  no points

 

 

 

Evaluation Comments: