Programs

Building Research Infrastructure Capacity (BRIC)
Discovery Research Education for African American Men in STEM (DRK-12)
Dr. John H. Hopps, Jr. Research Scholars Program (HOPPS)
Health Careers Opportunity Program
Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP)
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)
Micro/Nano Optics Research & Engineering (MORE) Laboratory
Minority Access to Research Careers/Undergraduate Student Training in Academic Research Program (MARC/U*STAR)
Minority Biomedical Research Support Program- Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement Program (RISE)
National Institute of Mental Health-Career Opportunities in Research Education and Training (NIMH-COR)
Public Health Sciences Institute (PHSI)
Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair)
S-STEM: Renaissance Scholarships to Train Future Engineers and Physical ScientistsSTEM Talent Expansion Program (STEP)

Program Description

Building Research Infrastructure Capacity (BRIC)

TThe BRIC program is specifically designed to enhance research infrastructure and capabilities by providing resources to strengthen faculty-initiated research projects and to foster more robust research training for faculty and students.

The BRIC program is especially vital at Morehouse because of our focus on the development of minority scientists and on health disparities. A particular focus of the program is supporting health disparity research by junior faculty, as well as increasing our entire faculty’s ability to compete for traditional research funds.

The program also aims to strengthen the access to and use of resources and training services – including library, data management and conferencing – through electronic media. The vision is that these shared facilities will foster collaborative projects in the area of health disparities.

Discovery Research Education for African American Men in STEM (DRK-12)

Growing the pool of talented and highly trained African American men to teach science and math is a critical goal supported by Morehouse College and the National Science Foundation. To achieve that, this recently established – and NSF-funded – program integrates science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) with teacher preparation. The heart of the effort lies in recruiting promising black male students in the 11th grade. These students participate in an intensive six-week summer program at Morehouse after their junior year in high school, followed by a year of Morehouse Saturday Academy sessions while seniors in high school. They then begin their academic careers at Morehouse through a summer pre-freshman program.

Dr. John H. Hopps, Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program (Hopps)

The major goal of the Dr. John H. Hopps, Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program is to increase by two-fold the number of Morehouse students pursuing graduate degrees in the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics. In order to achieve this goal, students must participate in a highly structured program that includes research-based mentoring with faculty, seminars, courses, and other social and extracurricular activities as well as initiatives designed to support the Dr. John H. Hopps, Jr. Defense Research Scholars Program. Furthermore, the program strives to equip its participants with the skills necessary to solve the problems of tomorrow through an interdisciplinary approach modeled after the efforts of Dr. John H. Hopps, Jr.

For more information, contact Rahmelle C. Thompson, DVM, Program Director, by telephone at (404) 653-7865, by fax at (404) 572-3635, by email at rthompso@morehouse.edu , by stopping by Nabrit, Mapp, McBay, room 221.

Health Careers Program

Established in 1974, the Office of Health Professions has played a major role in attracting and increasing the numbers of Morehouse undergraduates applying to and entering health professional schools. In keeping with the institution’s commitment to address the critical shortage of minority health professionals, a two-year school of medicine at Morehouse College was opened in 1979, which is now a fully accredited four-year medical school.

Morehouse College has an outstanding history of producing health professionals, with more than one thousand physicians and dentist are among its alumni.

The specific aims of the Office are:

• To advise and assist students in preparing for careers in the health professions;
• To increase the motivation and awareness of pre-health professions students in the health professions;
• To improve the performance of pre-health professions students on standardized entrance exams to health professional schools; and
• To assist students with all aspects of the application process to pre-health professions schools.

For more information, click here.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP)

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program at Morehouse College – through the support of National Science Foundation – is enhancing the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics instructional and outreach programs as a means to increase participation in the Nation’s science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce. Project objectives include (1) increasing the number of STEM graduates; (2) increasing the number of STEM graduates who enter graduate school in pursuit of research careers; and (3) increasing the success of STEM majors in graduate school, and the STEM workforce.

For more information, click here.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Developing the next generation of scientists who will search for critical answers is also at the core of the Division of Science and Mathematics. On its website, the Howard Hughes Medical Institutes states, “We live in an era of discovery. Each day, scientists bring us closer to understanding fundamental questions about human life. The quest for answers – as well as the promise of what those answers might yield – is at the hear of our work.” The generous support of HHMI enables academically advanced Morehouse students to develop close research mentorships with faculty in the Division as part of an intensive program that integrates classroom and laboratory research during the summer and throughout the academic year. To meet the rigorous demands of one of the programs requirements – participation in the Frederick E. Mapp Symposium – these budding researchers have investigated, written about and presented their findings on subjects ranging from measuring the efficiency of commercial media on stem cell growth and differentiation to diabetes and its negative effects on the structure and function of sensory neurons; from production of resin-bound unnatural amino acids to discovering more about HIV proteins.

For more information, click here.

Micro/Nano Optics Research & Engineering (MORE) Laboratory

This state-of-the-art instructional and research laboratory, founded and directed by Willie Rockward, chair of the Department of Physics and Dual Degree Engineering Program, boasts an array of advanced technology not normally available to undergraduates – ranging from optical and computational software to photolithography equipment; from a light scatterometer system to nanostructure characterization equipment.

When you marry the resources of this laboratory and the Division’s collaborative relationships with several major institutions, the results are “change makers.” It is a strong union that drives research in non-invasive optical imaging, as well as creates exciting new educational initiatives to engage and inspire future science professionals. Among the notable projects: modeling, fabrication and characterization of micro/nano optical elements for passive imaging; polarization analysis and signatures using continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging systems; and development of experimental training modules (TMs) in nuclear science and optical physics.When you marry the resources of this laboratory and the Division’s collaborative relationships with several major institutions, the results are “change makers.” It is a strong union that drives research in non-invasive optical imaging, as well as creates exciting new educational initiatives to engage and inspire future science professionals. Among the notable projects: modeling, fabrication and characterization of micro/nano optical elements for passive imaging; polarization analysis and signatures using continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging systems; and development of experimental training modules (TMs) in nuclear science and optical physics.

Minority Access to Research Careers/Undergraduate Student Training in Academic Research Program (MARC/U*STAR)

The nationally admired program propels a student to fulfill his intentions of earning an advanced degree that is his bridge to a biomedical research career – in industry, healthcare or academia. Funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (part of the national Institutes of Health) and aimed specifically at increasing the pool of minority students who demonstrate the talents and ambitions to earn a PhD or MD/PhD, this honors program provides substantial tuition and other support funding, and is open to sophomores and juniors majoring in biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, physics or psychology. Accepted students are widely recognized as high-achievers destined for careers driven by discovery.

NIMH-COR - National Institute of Mental Health-Career Opportunities in Research Education and Training

This two-year honors program is open to rising juniors interested in pursuing a doctoral-level research program in the biomedical, behavioral sciences or health services areas relevant to mental health. Some of the sub-disciplines covered include neuropsychology, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, health psychology, psychopharmacology, behavior genetics, health economics, social policy, epidemiology, biostatistics and physiology, with a concentration on issues and problems in mental health. Participants receive a monthly stipend, funding to attend scientific conferences and partial payment of tuition and fees.

One popular distinction is that the program links students to valuable summer research opportunities. On the long list of possible locations are Albert Einstein College of Medicine, American Society of Microbiology and Boston University School of Medicine.

For more information, click here.

PHSI – Public Health Sciences Institute

Training students who will diversify the public health sciences workforce is a top-tier objective of the Division of Science and Mathematics. The Public Health Sciences Institute (PHSI) was created under a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is the only undergraduate program with a concentration in public health in the Atlanta University Center. PHSI functions as an academic program that formulates and implements strategies that lead to positive outcomes for underrepresented minority Americans and has made a commitment to training and mentoring undergraduate students in biostatistics, epidemiology, and occupational safety and health.

PHSI actively sponsors activities such as internship programs, and interdisciplinary seminar series, public health awareness conferences, a minor concentration in public health, and student-faculty teams for research and mentoring.

For more information, click here.

RISE - Minority Biomedical Research Support Program- Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement Program

The primary goals of the Morehouse College MBRS RISE Program are to increase the number of Morehouse students successfully matriculating in the sciences, and increase the number of graduates pursuing and completing graduate study in biomedical research programs. The program is based on a philosophy which endorses a community of learners and scholars as a vehicle to research training. In addition to academic mentoring and research training experiences, scholars are required to participate in a number of activities that enhance group cohesion, peer support and community service.

For more information, click here.

Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program (McNair)

Earning a Ph.D. is one of the definitive measures of academic ability and personal determination. It symbolizes outstanding career potential and ultimate career success. However, the road to a Ph.D. can be arduous and intimidating, especially for students from underrepresented segments of society.

The Morehouse College Ronald E. McNair Post Baccalaureate Achievement Program was created to facilitate the journey. It is a year-round graduate school preparatory internship with an eight-week summer research component. The program also provides students the opportunity to publish with their faculty mentors and/or present research findings, and assistance with the graduate school application process.

McNair is a TRIO Program, funded by the United States Department of Education to assist low-income individuals, first generation college students and individuals with disabilities as they progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to post baccalaureate programs – building their confidence and expanding their horizons along the way.

S-STEM: Renaissance Scholarships to Train Future Engineers and Physical Scientists

The world needs more engineers. The engineering field needs far more African American practitioners. This dual motivation led the Division of Science and Mathematics to develop a pre-engineering program that aligns with the National Academy of Engineering’s Engineer of 2020 vision.

The program, limited to 32 students, supplements basic science studies in engineering-relevant fields (e.g. physics, chemistry, computer science and mathematics) through coursework, research, support programs and service projects. Participants who complete the program with a B.S. degree will be able to enter graduate school with leadership skills, social proclivity and academic breadth.

STEP - STEM Talent Expansion Program

The purpose of the STEP program is to increase the number of students in the Division of Science and Mathematics who receive baccalaureate degrees, by increasing retention. Project objectives include (1) Identifying at-risk students in their freshman year, and then providing these students with skills that are necessary to overcome stumbling blocks in the majors with Scientific Literacy courses. (2) Providing a comprehensive support program within the Division of Science and Mathematics that includes student intervention, cohort collaboration, automated systems for intervention, academic support and undergraduate student research opportunities as well as faculty training; and (3) Establishing an environment in which students discover, through experience, the added value of team learning; thereby, creating a culture at Morehouse that supports collaborative learning.

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